The supportedInterfaceOrientations method doesn't override any method from its superclass The supportedInterfaceOrientations method doesn't override any method from its superclass ios ios

The supportedInterfaceOrientations method doesn't override any method from its superclass


Like this:

override var supportedInterfaceOrientations : UIInterfaceOrientationMask {

...and the rest as you have it.

The general pattern

A lot of Cocoa methods are properties now, so you implement them as override computed variables. So the pattern for moving from seed 3 (or earlier) to seed 4 is:

  • Change func to var

  • Delete ()

  • Change -> to :

This works because a computed variable has a getter function, so the function you were implementing before simply turns into the getter function. And these are read-only properties, so you won't need a setter.

Similarly affected methods are preferredStatusBarStyle, prefersStatusBarHidden, shouldAutorotate, preferredInterfaceOrientationForPresentation, and many others. Look for UIKIT_DEFINE_AS_PROPERTIES in the Objective-C header.

Implications

In the longer term, there are other changes you can make. For example, you can add a setter (dividing your implementation into get and set functions), and thus you can turn your implementation into a facade for a stored property. For example:

private var _orientations = UIInterfaceOrientationMask.portraitoverride var supportedInterfaceOrientations : UIInterfaceOrientationMask {    get { return self._orientations }    set { self._orientations = newValue }}

So now your code has a way to set this value. If you were returning different values at different times, this could make things a lot cleaner.

Further technical notes

Interestingly, this change has no direct effect on existing Objective-C code, because in Objective-C, the new property declaration, @property(nonatomic, readonly) UIInterfaceOrientationMask supportedInterfaceOrientations;, is satisfied by the same method as before:

- (UIInterfaceOrientationMask)supportedInterfaceOrientations {    return UIInterfaceOrientationMaskPortrait;}

The reason is that in Objective-C, a @property(readonly) is merely a promise that a corresponding getter method exists, and that's exactly what this method is. But in Swift, the way to write an Objective-C property's getter method is through a property, that is, through an instance variable. So only Swift code is affected by the change: you have to rewrite your methods as properties.


matomo